One Book One Community

 

Williamsburg Regional Library and William & Mary are partnering to bring you One Book One Community, a new initiative that encourages the community to come together and have a shared reading experience. The inaugural selection for this series is Tommy Orange's There There, a breakout bestseller that tells the story of 12 Native Americans living in Oakland, CA. As the first Big Oakland Powwow approaches, the characters share their stories in alternately funny, heartbreaking, and violent detail.

Throughout the month of January, we'll be hosting a variety of programs that complement this novel, including a visit from the author. This author visit is made possible thanks to the generosity of William & Mary -- our partner in the One Book One Community initiative -- and the Friends of Williamsburg Regional Library.

Read on for a complete schedule of events.

Signature Event -- Author Visit: Tommy Orange: 1/24, 7 p.m., Williamsburg Library

Author Tommy Orange visits the Williamsburg Library Theatre as part of our One Book One Community partnership with William & Mary. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, winner of a National Book Critics Circle prize and the American Book Award, Tommy Orange's breakout bestseller tells the story of 12 Native Americans living in Oakland, CA. As the first Big Oakland Powwow approaches, the 12 tell their stories in alternately funny, heartbreaking, and violent detail.

Alcatraz is Not an Island Documentary Screening: 1/6 at 2 p.m. and 1/9 at 7 p.m., Williamsburg Library

From November 1969 to June 1971, Native Americans from across the country occupied Alcatraz. How did the idea come about, how did activists led by the American Indian Movement successfully land on the island, and what happened when the occupation ended? Archival film and interviews with participants bring an immediacy to the Emmy Award-winning documentary originally shown on PBS.

Novel Ideas: There There Book Group Discussion: 1/13, 2 p.m., James City County Library

Novel Ideas is a librarian-led exploration of classic and contemporary fiction and nonfiction from around the world. This wide-ranging group will sample critically acclaimed and prize-winning titles with open and inclusive discussion aimed at engaging readers with the book and with each other.

A History of the American Indian Movement: 1/15, 7 p.m., Williamsburg Library

Against the backdrop of the anti-war and civil rights movements of the late 1960s, the American Indian Movement (AIM) emerged to address Native people's concerns about broken treaties, poverty and cultural preservation. The occupation of Alcatraz Island and Wounded Knee, South Dakota were two of AIM's most prominent protests. Tommy Orange included them as significant historical events that affect characters in There There.​ Danielle Moretti-Langholtz, Ph.D. (Director of the American Indian Resource Center and Curator of Native American Art at William & Mary) will provide an overview of the rise of AIM and its impact on issues of tribal sovereignty and indigenous rights.
 
Turning Pages: There There Book Group Discussion: 1/21, 7 p.m., Williamsburg Library

Novel Ideas is a librarian-led exploration of classic and contemporary fiction and nonfiction from around the world. This wide-ranging group will sample critically acclaimed and prize-winning titles with open and inclusive discussion aimed at engaging readers with the book and with each other.

The Lives of Urban Indians: 1/23, 7 p.m., Williamsburg Library

How are the lives of urban Indians, such as those in There There, different from the popular image of modern Indian life? How are they similar? Like 80% of all Native peoples, Theresa Rocha Beardall, an Oneida, grew up in an urban environment. Now an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Virginia Tech, she will discuss her own life and the work that led her to examine way the law and larger society affect Indian lives today.  She will also talk about her plans to use There There, which "radically shifted the visibility of urban Indians," as an introduction to American Studies.

Open Book Discussion: There There: 1/27, 7 p.m., Stryker Center

This one-time discussion group will be discussing Tommy Orange's There There after his January 24 visit. 

William & Mary American Indian Students Speak: 1/29, 7 p.m., Williamsburg Library

Members of William & Mary's American Indian Student Association will talk about their experiences with the powwow culture and the role it plays in their lives They'll also show images and talk about the regalia powwow participants use in honoring their heritage and creating their own identities.